• I don’t know what this is, but whatever is going on here, they got this shit on lock-down.

  • …and then I says, I says, “Cormac, did you know I was a programmer for 10 years? Maybe I can help you…?” Longer than you’ve been alive, I think to myself! And this guy - you know, chip of the old block, not taking any shit, no fucks to give to the Olds, this little fellow! - he’s all like, “but, daddy, you don’t KNOW Minecraft!”

  • 🗂 Keeping the Lines Open

    Tools and practices for remote agile stuff. builttoadapt.io/tk-65faab…

  • 🗂 Q

    When we create, we put forward a case for how we should interact with tech in future, and by extension how we should interact with each other. At the same time, we’re discarding thousands of alternative futures. www.infoq.com/articles/…

  • 🗂 Open Source, Enterprise Software, and Free Lumber

    Please believe me when I say that I totally agree with Holger’s assertion that this process produces absolutely top quality software – and that the people doing the work are often among the very best in their respective corners of the software world. My main beef – which is why I use the term suckers – is that I think they should be compensated when that good hard work results in someone else – particularly a VC-backed company – making money on the fruit of their labor, in Red Hat’s case about $3 billion last year, with almost $500 million in profits, that after IBM bought the company for $34 billion. Or to use the Oracle example in Holger’s post: hell yes Oracle put aside a 1000 FTE effort in favor of adopting Apache – why not use the free labor of others to save a ton of money to be better used, or not, in Oracle’s case, elsewhere? The more free labor, or lumber, or whatever, the better.

    Who will think of the poor open source developer? www.eaconsult.com/2019/01/1…

  • 🗂 Some high-profile wins at Microsoft of late, in retail

    The customer win is another example of retailers choosing cloud vendors that are not Amazon. Microsoft last week announced a retail-as-a-service (RaaS) partnership with Kroger, with the super market giant splitting its cloud investments between Azure and Google Cloud Platform. Walmart is also partnering with Microsoft, with the retailer and frequent Amazon foe signing up to use Microsoft 365, AI, IoT tools and Azure.

    Microsoft or Google is what you got in retail. Otherwise you’re just finding a competitor. www.zdnet.com/article/m…

  • 🗂 Knative Update Shows It’s Serious About Serverless

  • 🗂 AWS For Everyone: New clues emerge about Amazon's secretive low-code/no-code project

    Earlier reports indicated that AWS has for some time been working on a cloud service that would allow people with little to no software development experience create simple business applications without having to call up the IT department, but it wasn’t clear what that entailed. www.geekwire.com/2019/aws-…

  • 🗂 Production Guideline

    Checklists of things to check before deploying. https://medium.com/@rakyll/production-guideline-9d5d10c8f1e

  • 🗂 Why Is Storage On Kubernetes Is So Hard?

  • 🗂 PKS - a Painkiller for Kubernetes

    The list of pains:

    One cluster is not enough Developers want clusters close to them, for low latency Data storage Day two operations - upgrading, scaling, capacity management Managing heterogeneous infrastructure underneath the platform Backup

  • 🗂 AWS, MongoDB, and the Economic Realities of Open Source

    This leaves MongoDB Inc. not unlike the record companies after the advent of downloads: what they sold was not software but rather the tools that made that software usable, but those tools are increasingly obsolete as computing moves to the cloud. And now AWS is selling what enterprises really want. stratechery.com/2019/aws-…

  • 🗂 ‘Inbox infinity’: is ignoring all your emails the secret to a happy 2019?

    Rather than trying to deal with every single email, let them pile up, and allow the digital tide to wash over you. Accept that the number of messages in your inbox will always be infinite because the time you have to deal with them will always be finite.

    To use the term of Make Time, flake-out more often. www.theguardian.com/technolog…

  • 🗂 Only the good meetings

    Finding a cadence upon which to work as an engineer can be difficult. As engineers are generally averse to meetings, oftentimes we wind up with sporadic meetings and a lot of people who are unclear on their priorities and goals. On the other side, we can find ourselves in environments that are extremely meeting heavy, and engineers often left wondering when there will be time to actually do the work they believed they were hired to do. The establishment of only necessary meetings, at specifically defined times, allows engineers to plan their time to minimize context switching, and and to maximize the time invested in their meetings with one another. tech.mangot.com/blog/2019…

  • 🗂 Fiction vs. Nonfiction

    The only difference is that with nonfiction, every fact in the book must refer to a document or a source outside of the book. www.advicetowriters.com/home/2019…

  • Amsterdamer problems.

  • 🗂 Why so many people who need the government hate it

    I’ve come to the conclusion that relationships are more important. And I think organizations need to be making these things much more clear to people in their everyday lives. I also think that, as a citizenry, we need to rethink how we talk about our lives and the role that government has had in it. www.vox.com/2018/8/17…

  • 🗂 The Rise and Demise of RSS

    Unfortunately, syndication on the modern web still only happens through one of a very small number of channels, meaning that none of us “retain control over our online personae” the way that Werbach imagined we would. One reason this happened is garden-variety corporate rapaciousness—RSS, an open format, didn’t give technology companies the control over data and eyeballs that they needed to sell ads, so they did not support it. But the more mundane reason is that centralized silos are just easier to design than common standards. Consensus is difficult to achieve and it takes time, but without consensus spurned developers will go off and create competing standards. The lesson here may be that if we want to see a better, more open web, we have to get better at working together.

    Kind of an overly complex conclusion. I’d say RSS died out because companies make a lot more money by keeping in their platform. There’s no way Facebook would bank so much if they were distributed (via RSS) versus centralized. By cutting off good API access, Twitter has been making this same move. There may be money in distributed content, for sure, but not as much as the golden handcuffs of Facebook’s model.

    Profits killed RSS, plain and simple. motherboard.vice.com/en_us/art…

  • 🗂 Culture

    We need to work with each other. To do that, we need to trust each other. The Air Force needs to have a generative culture, not a pathological one, for a software company to thrive. It has to be safe to talk openly about what we know today, even if it might change tomorrow, without fear of reprisal for “getting it wrong”. www.linkedin.com/pulse/my-…

  • 🗂 Kromhout Kubernetes Tour

    Why you’d use it, what it does, the parts, and the additional stuff you’ll need. www.infoq.com/presentat…

  • Get in there and figure your shit out, champ. Then come give these God damned slides.

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